Sunday 1st of December “Piccadilly Pick-a-Dozen
10am - 1pm, Tapanappa Winery. Load up the car with wine for the festive season!
Taste and buy wines from Terre a Terre /DAOSA, Tapanappa, CRFT, Barratt Wines and Greenhill WInes.
Sausage sizzle, coffee, cherries and flower stall!

Foggy Hill Vineyard 2007 Pinot Noir Latest Reviews

Tapanappa Foggy Hill Pinot Noir 2007

Author: 
Sarah Ahmed
Source: 
The Wine Detective
Review Date: 
July 2009

sweet red cherry nose with 5 spice which flavours follow through on the palate. A touch muddy, despite quite present tannins ? perhaps young (4 year old) vines yet to find their voice?

Tapanappa, meeting with Brian Croser 2009

Author: 
Sarah Ahmed
Source: 
The WIne Detective
Review Date: 
July 2009

Brian Croser is the man who founded pioneering winery, Petaluma, the first in the Adelaide Hills. He is known as Australia's original ?terroirist? for his unrelenting pursuit of his countryman, Dr AC Kelly's vision of 1867 that ?in the great diversity of soil and climate to be found in Australia, there is little doubt that every variety cultivated in Europe would somewhere find a suitable location.?

Wines of the Week - 2007 Tapanappa Foggy Hill Pinot Noir

Author: 
Joanna Simon
Source: 
www.joannasimon.com
Review Date: 
21st of August 2009

Pinot noir at it's purest and most seductive, with plum and cherry aromas, a hint of oriental spice, the silkiest of textures and an underpinning of delicate acidity and supple tannins. Brian Croser says that the next vintage of this wine, the 2008, is the most exciting that his 41 years of being a vigneron have produced. Can?t wait.

A bit of background: Tapanappa is a partnership of Brian Croser, who founded Petaluma, with Champagne Bollinger and the Cazes family of Château Lynch-Bages. The other wines, equally recommended, are Whalebone Vineyard Cabernet Shiraz and Whalebone Merlot (both around £30-£36). I?ve held back on my Tapanappa recommendations because they don?t look very recession-friendly, but they would be a great way to celebrate at home instead of going out and would make ideal presents for wine lovers (thanks, my birthday is in January, but Christmas will do).

Tapanappa 2007 Foggy Hill Vineyard Pinot Noir - 91 Points & 4 Stars

Author: 
Nick Stock
Source: 
Penguin Good Australian Wine Guide 2009
Review Date: 
May 2009

Plenty of vinous cherry fruit aroma and some briary forest characters here, earthy, the oak is spicy and sits up in the mix, strong anise, some clove too. Fine gentle tannins and ripe soft fruits, liquorice and flighty cherry fruit flavour. Musky balanced finish.

Worth Collecting - Tapanappa 2007 Foggy Hill Pinot Noir

Author: 
Windsor Dobbin
Source: 
Travel & Living Issue 37
Review Date: 
January 2009

The first release from the experimental Foggy Hill vineyard. Very varietal and proudly unfiltered, it's made from grapes from a vineyard that is at the highest point of the Fleurieu Peninsula. It's idiosyncratic and superb.

Drink with barbecued duck.

Seasonal sipping

Author: 
David Sly
Source: 
SA Life
Review Date: 
December 2008

I'd serve a discreet, flavour driven pinot with the roast turkey - and this handsome wine from Foggy Hill vineyard on Brian Croser's southern Fleurieu property is startling for the depth of flavour from only five-year-old vines. The Tapanappa winery partnership between the Crosers and the Bollinger and Cazes families of France continues to focus on premium quality and precision in its flavour profiles. This has an intensity and complexity that is unexpected from such young vines, and from their first vintage committed to bottling: lush cherry, savoury tannins and earth minerality, with great palate length amplified by a generous seam of natural acid that keeps the fruit flavours bright and vibrant. It's only available in small volume (850 cases) but worth hunting down.

Hidden Gems: We highlight six new sensational wineries

Author: 
Windsor Dobbin
Source: 
Luxury Travel & Style
Review Date: 
Spring 2008

Former Petaluma chief winemaker Brian Croser has linked with the family that owns Bollinger Champagnes, and the Cazes family of Bordeaux, to produce site-specific Tapanappa wines of the highest quality. They come from the Whalebone vineyard in Wrattonbully, Croser's family vineyard in the Adelaide Hills, and a new vineyard on the Fleurieu Peninsula. The new-release 2007 Tiers Chardonnay ($75), and 2007 Foggy Hill Vineyard Pinot Noir ($50), are both world-class wines, www.tapanappawines.com.au.

pinot envy - Tapanappa, Foggy Hill Pinot Noir 2007

Author: 
Susanna Forbes
Source: 
imbibe
Review Date: 
Sept / Oct 2008

Staying true to form, the Franco-Aussie partnership started by Australian pioneer, Brian Croser, has produced a wine with great potential. It had the panel salivation; veal, grilled beef with truffles and bresaola were a few of the suggestions.

'With an intense nose of dried strawberries, this has a good refreshing flavour, but needs time.' RJ

'An interesting, evolving nose. this is beautifully balanced and well-rounded. Excellent length.' KC

'I was expecting top quality, well-made, individual wines. Australia has an interventionalist style which let the side down, although Tapanappa Foggy Hill was a breath of fresh air and very individual in approach' Kyri Christodoulou, The East Room.

Tapanappa Foggy Hill Vineyard Fleurieu Peninsula Pinot Noir 2007

Author: 
Chris Shanahan
Source: 
Canberra Times
Review Date: 
15th of June 2008

Brian Croser's first wine from a vineyard planted in 2003 on a cold, foggy 350-metre peak of the Fleurieu Peninsula. This is promising pinot from one of Australia's most significant wine figures. But Brian, could we please have another few months in barrel next vintage?

Off the shelf

Author: 
Judy Sarris
Source: 
Gourmet Traveller WINE
Review Date: 
August 2008

2007 Tapanappa Pinot Noir, Fleurieu Peninsula

Nearly all you need to know about this wine is printed on the back and front labels of the bottle; for example, the fruit hails from the Foggy Hill vineyard situated at Parawa, the highest point of the peninsula. How about that the Bernard clones of pinot noir are densely planted in a vineyard littered with 67-million-year-old ironstone and produce a meagre crop of 5 tonnes per hectare. Or that only 850 cases of the wine were made. The most important part is what's inside the bottle. This is magnificent pinot noir made by Brian Croser, who describes his wine (yes, on the label) as "a pure expression of a unique Australian terroir".

Pages