Sunday 1st of December “Piccadilly Pick-a-Dozen
10am - 1pm, Tapanappa Winery. Load up the car with wine for the festive season!
Taste and buy wines from Terre a Terre /DAOSA, Tapanappa, CRFT, Barratt Wines and Greenhill WInes.
Sausage sizzle, coffee, cherries and flower stall!

Whalebone Vineyard Latest Reviews

Tapanappa Wines Whalebone Vineyard Merlot Cabernet Franc 2007 - 93 Points

Author: 
Campbell Mattinson
Source: 
The Wine Front
Review Date: 
5th of October 2011

Whopping price on this first-release merlot-cabernet franc blend from Tapanappa’s Whalebone Vineyard. But the wine quality is excellent.

Elegant, finely structured, ripe but not sweet. It walks the talk of modern Australian red wine. It tastes of pencil and fresh herbs, leather and dark cherry. It has some curranty oomph, but it’s not a big bellied wine; it’s medium weight, almost slender. Vibrant aroma. Dry finish. Minor amount of eucalypt. Aftertaste of aniseed. It’s a red wine I’d be more than happy to have in my glass.

Rated : 93 Points

Drink : 2012 - 2017

Original review: http://www.winefront.com.au/tapanappa-whalebone-vineyard-merlot-cabernet...

The appeal of cabernet franc

Author: 
John Fordham
Source: 
The Sunday Telegraph
Review Date: 
2nd of October 2011

BRIAN Croser believes he's discovered Australia's true home for growing cabernet franc.

Holding court at Sydney's Quarter Twenty One, Croser proudly presented his latest super-premium Tapanappa red - 2007 Whalebone Vineyard Merlot Cabernet Franc ($85) - and he used the opportunity to heap huge praise on the Whalebone vineyard he purchased at Wrattonbully a decade ago.

Just north of Coonawarra, the vineyard features cabernet sauvignon, shiraz, merlot and cabernet franc. Croser quickly moved the conversation to cabernet franc, the variety that figures prominently in the classic red wines of Bordeaux.

Tapanappa Wrattonbully Cabernet Shiraz 2007

Author: 
Andrew Graham
Source: 
Australian WIne Review
Review Date: 
5th of September 2011

Sourced from one of the hottest vintages ever for the Tapanappa Wrattonbully vintage and it shows here - not even the high quality oak and astute winemaking can hide it.

Dusty, stewed blackberry, cedar and slightly caramelised red fruit nose. Fresher palate with initial burst of blackberry fruit, yet still carries the caramelised edges of the vintage. Drying, alcoholic finish is a fraction hard too. Just not quite in the freshness zone, though the extraction guarantees that this will make old bones. Winemaking still looks good regardless. 16/87

Original Review: http://www.ozwinereview.com/2011/09/tapanappa-wrattonbully-cabernet-shiraz.html

Joanna, Wrattonbully 2007 Cabernet Shiraz - 91 points

Author: 
James Halliday
Source: 
Australian Wine Companion
Review Date: 
27th of July 2011

Fragrant red fruits, sage and cedary oak combine on the bouquet; the palate is medium-bodied, with ample polished and rounded tannins, providing texture to the gentle fruit and spice on offer.

91 points / 4½ goblets - Drink by: 2016

Tapanappa Cabernet Shiraz 2007

Author: 
Patrick Haddock
Source: 
www.winingpom.com.au
Review Date: 
5th of July 2011

Here’s the new range from Brian Croser’s ‘Wines of Terroir’ series, showing how Cabernet and Shiraz from Wrattonbully are a force to be reckoned with. This is a sibling to the Whalebone, from the Joanna vineyard where grapes grow on red clay loams over limestone, dating back 34 million years. No compromising on the quality here, with low yielding vines expressing an essential sense of place.

It’s vivid with plum, violets eucalpyt, chocolate and antique varnished chairs. An earthy palate ensues with lovely black fruit and spice, some charry oak, a little green, leafy character too. Great texture and slight warmth, while firm tannins see it through the long finish. Still plenty of life ahead for this elegant and understated performer. It will age with grace and express even more given time.

2007 Wrattonbully, Joanna Cabernet Shiraz

Author: 
Chris Shanahan
Source: 
Canberra Times
Review Date: 
25th of May 2011

After Lion-Nathan’s acquisition of Brian Croser’s much-loved Petaluma Wine, Croser established Tapanappa with Jean-Michel Cazes of Chateau Lynch-Bages, Bordeaux, and Societe Jacques Bollinger, the parent company of Champagne Bollinger. In 2003 Tapanappa acquired Koppamurra Vineyard (established in 1974 by John Greenshields). The vineyard, since extended and renamed Whalebone, contributed the cabernet sauvignon to this blend, the shiraz coming from neighbour, Rob Hooper. Croser made the wine in the Petaluma Winery, Adelaide Hills. It’s very ‘Petaluma’ in style – clean, fresh and ripe but not over-ripe, beautifully balanced and not a hair out of place, so to speak. It’s elegant, restrained and likely to evolve well over time.

Cool nights and Cab Sauv

Author: 
David Ridge
Source: 
The Adelaide Review
Review Date: 
May 2011

2007 Wrattonbully Cabernet Shiraz

Here’s a red with pedigree; a nephew of one of Australia’s all-time great reds, the famous 79 Petaluma Coonawarra. This one from nearby Wrattonbully is not a blockbuster but a wine of complete but not excessive ripeness, balance and length. This is elegance. The maker is well known and his label, Tapanappa, adorns Brian Croser’s post-Petaluma collection of wines from specific (and cool) terroirs that express a personality. Cabernet (70 percent) and Shiraz from neighbouring vineyards planted in red clay loam over ancient limestone in the Joanna locality, combine to offer gorgeous aromatics and flavours of raspberry, anise, smoke and spice in an even and persistent package. The wine is enlived by nice nervy structure and finishing zip.

Review of the Tapanappa Wines range

Author: 
Alontin
Source: 
http://australianwinereviews.blogspot.com/
Review Date: 
24th/25th of February 2011

I have a small number of Tapanappa wines in my cellar, but never tasted the full range until last night. I cannot think of another small Australian winery which produces four different wines at such an outstanding level. I much prefer these wines to Brian Croser's old Petaluma range. Every wine I tried I would rate in the 95/96 point range.

The 2008 Tiers Vineyard Chardonnay is brilliant. Made in the style of a leading Montrachet, it undergoes 100% malolactic fermentation. Despite this, there is enough acidity to balance the ripe lemon and creamy flavours. The wine is matured in 50% new oak, and it shows, but it is not overwhelming. Not many Chardonnay vines in Australia benefit from the full French treatment, but this wine is outstanding and justifies its hefty price tag.

Top drops - Peter Forrestal rates three of the best for STM

Author: 
Peter Forrestal
Source: 
Sunday Times
Review Date: 
13th of February 2011

2008 Tapanappa Tiers Chardonnay

Brian Croser lives alongside the superb Tiers vineyard in the Adelaide Hills and coaxes one of the country’s finest chardonnays from its 30-year-old vines. This has restraint and fruit purity, wonderful texture and bright, refreshing acidity.

2009 Tapanappa Foggy Hill Pinot Noir

From a mild, dry growing season in Southern Fleurieu Peninsula in SA comes this brooding, age-worthy pinot that is tight, fine and showing power, restrained dark-cherry and raspberry-pith flavours.

2006 Tapanappa Whalebone Cabernet Shiraz

Cellar Notes - 2006 Whalebone Merlot 93 points

Author: 
Ken Gargett
Source: 
Courier Mail
Review Date: 
5th of February 2011

 

Most drinkers regard merlot as a simple, light quafer with hints of plum and raspberry but the best merlots offer intensity, depth of flavour, firm tannin structure and serious length. Merlot works best blended with cabernet and other Bordeaux varieties, though it can star as a solo actor with just a splash of something else. There's the stunning, and stunningly expensive, Chateau Petrus from Pomerol in Bordeaux, and a couple of great Italians, most notably Maseto from Tuscany. Efforts to identify the best region for merlot in Australia are ongoing. Our producers make value merlots, which drink as basic reds, as well as wines of the highest quality with prices to match.

 

Tapanappa Whalebone Vineyard Merlot 2006

Intense, balanced and yet retaining a degree of elegance. Flavours edge through dried fruits, plum and liqueur fruit cake. [93 points]

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