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Tapanappa News, Articles & Reviews

Highlights From a Visit Down Under

Author: 
Harvey Steiman
Source: 
Wine Spectator Blog
Review Date: 
5th of May 2007

Now that I'm back from Australia, I've compiled the following small but quirky list of highs and lows:

Most Pleasant Surprise (Barrel Tasting Division): Pinot Noir from Brian Croser's new Foggy Hill vineyard way down on the Fleurieu Peninsula, south of Adelaide. This 10-acre vineyard sits atop a craggy hillside, above the fog line most days. It looks like Sonoma Coast, and the wines taste like they come from it. The first wines, from 2007, are destined for the Tapanappa label Croser owns with Jean-Michel Cazes of Bordeaux and Bollinger of Champagne. If they make it into the bottle with the flavor profile, texture and length they showed in the barrel, they could be the best Pinots in Australia.

Croser gets into South Australia Pinot

Author: 
Adam Lechmere
Source: 
Decanter.com - Latest News
Review Date: 
May the 4th 2007

Australian wine producer Brian Croser is pioneering Pinot Noir in South Australia to add to the highly-regarded Tapanappa range.

Croser, a Decanter Man of the Year and one of the most influential men in the Australian wine industry, has four hectares of Pinot at a place called Yankallilla on the Fleurieu peninsula south of Adelaide.

The land is 'like Sonoma', export manager Xavier Bizot told decanter.com. 'Cool, quite windy, and perfect for Pinot. Brian is very enthusiastic about it.'

The vines - three different Burgundy clones - are now around four years old. The first harvest was earlier this year.

Croser is experimenting with different types of crush for different batches: whole-bunch pressing, full crush etc.

Yankallilla is where Croser keeps a beach house. 'Brian is well-known down there. They call it Cape Croser,' Bizot said. 'Yankallilla actually means 'Place of bad smells' in the local aboriginal dialect, because of all the whales there.'

The Pinot will be sold in high-end restaurants worldwide alongside the rest of the Tapanappa range: a Chardonnay, Merlot and Cabernet Shiraz, all of which retail in the UK at around £30.

Tapanappa by Brian Croser

Author: 
Tom Cannavan
Source: 
www.wine-pages.com
Review Date: 
1st of May 2007

Meaning 'Stick to the path' in aboriginal language, Tapanappa is a super-premium Australian label, launched by one of the great names of Australian winemaking, Brian Croser (left). Croser found fame as owner and winemaker at Petaluma, one of Australia's icon estates. In late 2001 Petaluma, which Croser had founded in 1976, was taken over by the giant Lion Nathan group. But "even as the ink was drying on the Petaluma purchase," as Croser says, he was putting together a plan for a new venture with long-time associates Champagne Bollinger and Bordeaux's Jean-Michel Cazes of Château Lynch-Bages.

Tapanappa Tiers Vineyard 2005 Chardonnay

Author: 
Tom Cannavan
Source: 
www.wine-pages.com
Review Date: 
1st of May 2007

The concept of Tapanappa is to make ultra-premium, terroir-specific wines from their South Australian vineyards. Tiers vineyard was selected for the Chardonnay because it "mirrors the southern end of the Cotes de Beaune, where the great Montrachets are grown." The wine pours a very delicate gold colour, with a gorgeous nose of very high quality French oak, giving notes of honey, toasted almonds and sesame seeds, and fine, racy orchard fruits. The palate has a lightly creamy, oatmeally quality and medium body, with a deliciously crisp lemon acidity immediately adding cut and edge to quite full, sweet fruit. There's an orange fruit brightness, and just a perception of more luscious, tropical tones. The wine stays quite crisp and racy through to the finish, with lovely succulence and balance. Very impressive stuff this.

Wine of the Month

Author: 
Campbell Mattinson
Source: 
The Wine Front
Review Date: 
April 2007

Wine Front April 2007.jpg

Brian Croser goes for Pinot

Author: 
Harvey Steiman
Source: 
Wine Spectator Blog
Review Date: 
18th of April 2007

Brian Croser has a 400-head (NB. should read 4000 head) sheep farm near Tunkalilla, way down on the Fleurieu Peninsula on the ocean (below McLaren Vale) where he has planted a few acres of Pinot Noir because it reminds him of the Sonoma Coast. Croser sold Petaluma, the winery he and his wife, Ann, started to Lion Nathan a few years ago and now has Tapanappa in partnership with Jean-Michel Cazes and Bollinger. He has a tidy stack of barrels now filled with the first vintage, 2007, which has just finished fermenting. Tasted from barrel, the wines actually do remind me of Sonoma Coast wines, with their pure, ripe fruit character and minerality. I think he's onto something. Most Australian Pinot Noir is pretty insipid stuff, except for a few pockets in Victoria. This vienyard actually has room to grow, if the finished wine is as good as anticipated. Croser has also replanted the top section of Tiers, the home vineyard at Petaluma Winery in the Adelaide Hills, to Dijon clones of Chardonnay. Ann still owns the vineyard, but half the grapes are sold by contract to Lion Nathan. Croser gets the young vines at the top for Tapanappa. The first vintage, 2005, was a stunner. Tapanappa is best known for its Cabernet-Shiraz blend, Whalebone Vineyard. Meanwhile, Croser is close to a deal with Lion Nathan to buy back the Petaluma Winery facility. Lion Nathan retains the brand and plans to consolidate the winemaking with its other South Australian operations.

Blend goes for Broke

Author: 
James Halliday
Source: 
The Weekend Australian
Review Date: 
April 7-8 2007

Later that day I proceeded to dinner with the same underlying message: there is never enough great wine and always too much mediocre product, the main virtue of which is its alcohol content. At the dinner the hosts were the three Tapanappa partners: Brian Croser, Jean-Michel Cazes of Chateau Lynch-Bages in Pauillac, Bordeaux, and Arnould d'Hautefeuille of Bollinger. (Strictly speaking, it is a partnership of three family-owned businesses.)

The wines, served with a splendid dinner at Circa, were: 1999 Bollinger Grand Annee; 2005 Tapanappa Tiers Vineyard Chardonnay; 2004 and 1995 Chateau Lynch-Bages; 2003 Chateau Les Ormes de Pez; 2004 and 2003 Tapanappa Whalebone Vineyard Cabernet Shiraz; 2002 Petaluma Essence Botrytis Semillon (an outsider these days); and a sneak preview of the superb Bollinger RD 1996.

Top 100 New Release Wines

Author: 
Huon Hooke
Source: 
Gourmet Traveller Wine
Review Date: 
April - May 2007

Tapanappa 2004 Whalebone Vineyard Cabernet Shiraz

5 stars, rating 95 points

A big wine with a lovely range of cabernet aromas, from mint and herbs to abundant dark fruit. It's concentrated and lingering, powerfully built and here for the long haul.

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